Events

Posted in Site Updates on Saturday, March 3rd, 2018

What’s On. Events in Harwich & Dovercourt. Search a whole host of events and festivals by date or browse our monthly calendar to find out what’s on.

 

  • Wed
    21
    Nov
    2018
    10:00 amOld Bank Studios,Harwich.
    Come along and be inspired by the original watercolours of the U Boat surrender and begin to develop your own work with the guidance of a local artist. Stimulated by the exhibition and original archive material, we welcome artists and makers alike to come and create responses to the Imperial War Museum paintings and produce your own work to be displayed in the Old Bank Studios in May 2019.

    10AM - 3PM

    Free session, exhibition of inspired work to be held in Spring 2019.

     

    www.harwichhavenhistory.co.uk

     

  • Wed
    28
    Nov
    2018
    3:30 pmOld Bank Studios,Harwich.
     

    Take part in a new creative textile project remembering the Kindertransport journey taken by 10,000 children 80 years ago. Come and try your hand at a range of textile and decorative techniques with a local artist inspired by the memories of the children and contribute to a large quilt project to be exhibited in 2019. Any skill level is welcome to explore this fascinating history and to take part in the community piece. This project will continue with sessions through to Summer 2019 and displayed across the town.

    10AM - 3PM

    Free to take part but please book through info@nhscic.org , ongoing project over winter. Exhibition in Spring 2019

     

    www.harwichhavenhistory.co.uk

     

  • Fri
    30
    Nov
    2018
    7:30 pmThe Navigator Scout Hut, Main Road, Harwich.

    Harwich Society Talks

  • Sat
    01
    Dec
    2018
    Get into the 1930s spirit and travel in style to Harwich in a themed train carriage commemorating the arrival of the Kindertransport. Join from Manningtree and experience songs from the era and hear about the extraordinary journey taken by 10,000 children before the outbreak of World War Two. A perfect way to begin your day before the main events of talks and walks.

    Sanctuary80 Event Train

     

    Through ESSCRP website or Greater Anglia, £5 Adult return ticket. http://www.esscrp.org.uk/

     

    www.harwichhavenhistory.co.uk

     

  • Sat
    01
    Dec
    2018
    11:30 amMayflower Heritage Centre, CO12 3NA

    Sanctuary80 Talk Series

    Hear from four speakers about a range of topics exploring the 80th anniversary of the arrival of the first Kindertransport refugees at Harwich in 1938 and what it means today. Includes an interactive theatre event, Stage 3, by Peoples Palace and Safe Passage’s National Campaign.

    11.30am Welcome

    11.40am Britain and the Kindertransport 1938-1940, by Barbara Warnock, from The Wiener Library.

    12.10pm ‘From Hitler to Hi-de-Hi’, the role of the Dovercourt Holiday Camp in the first months of the Kindertransport, by Mike Levy, Fellow, Holocaust Centre Imperial War Museum.

    12.40pm 100 Images of Migration exhibition, presented by the Migration Museum, London.

    1.00 Lunch

    2.00pm Stage 3, drama and discussion by Peoples Palace and Safe Passage’s National Campaign.

    2.30pm Time to explore the Harwich Station Museum

    3.00pm Migration in Historical Context and the 21st Century, by Martin Simmonds from The Suffolk Refugee Support

    3.30pm Memory of the Kindertransports in national and transnational perspectives, by Amy Williams, Nottingham Trent University.

    4.00pm Discussion and questions with the speakers.

     

    Speakers:

    Britain and the Kindertransport 1938-1940

    Dr Barbara Warnock of The Wiener Library will draw upon the library’s rich archival collections to explain the origins and nature of the Kindertransport, the British programme to rescue 10,000 mainly Jewish children from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland and the Netherlands from the Nazi threat. The presentation will explore the circumstances in which the programme was launched, the work of the Jewish and other community groups that organised and funded it, and reflect upon some of the experiences of the Kindertransportees themselves.

    The Wiener Library, London, is a partner on the Harwich Haven: Surrender to Sanctuary project. It is the world’s oldest archive of material on the Nazi era and the Holocaust.

    Barbara Warnock obtained her PhD from Birkbeck College, University of London in 2016. Her research focussed upon interwar Austria. She is the Education and Outreach Manager for The Wiener Library, where she curates their exhibitions and organises the education and events programme. She was a history teacher for many years.

    Amy Williams is a PhD researcher in History at Nottingham Trent University, financed by the Midlands4Cities AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership. She is working on a study of the Memory of the Kindertransports in National and Transnational Perspective, exploring the way the Kindertransports have been represented in novels, museums, memorials, testimony and autobiography.

    Memory of the Kindertransports in national and transnational perspectives:

    This talk sets out to present an overview of the different national and transnational memories of the Kindertransports. Kindertransports is understood here as referring not just to the actual rescue of children with Jewish origins from Nazism (1938-1940), but also its effects such as transplantation to strange environments. There is yet to be a true comparison of how the host nations – Britain, America, Canada, Australia and New Zealand – received the Kinder and integrated them, and of how the memories of the Kinder and the nations’ memories of the Kindertransports developed. A comparison of these various host countries will reveal that memory of the Kindertransports is not uniform, but shaped by national factors such as the role of these countries in the Second World War, their postwar political, economic and social development, social and cultural policies towards refugees, and nationally conditioned memory discourses. However, no memory is entirely nationally bounded. Increasingly, Holocaust memory operates in a transnational, even global network. Therefore, the specific interaction of such global memory with national memory patterns in the case of the Kindertransports will be central to this talk. Moreover, it is important to examine the relationship between the national and transnational because each host nation approaches the topic of the Kindertransports differently. For some host nations present the Kindertransports in national terms with transnational elements while other host nations see the transnational perspective more clearly. However, although some host nations may be more self-critical than others, it is not to say that we should assume that these host nations inevitably depict a more complex or comprehensive narrative of the Kindertransports. For it is also possible that the transnational narrative becomes renationalised, thus some national memories may compete with one another. On the other hand, the greater awareness the host countries have of the transnational history of the transports the more they are open to discuss the complexities.

     

    ‘From Hitler to Hi-de-Hi’, the role of the Dovercourt Holiday Camp in the first months of the Kindertransport.

    From December 1938, Warner’s holiday camp in Dovercourt served as the main transit camp for hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Jewish children fleeing from Nazi persecution. Examples of warm welcome from Harwich people mingle with sadder tales of freezing cabins and anxiety over lost parents and family. Dovercourt was a place of life-changing events and incredible stories which have no less power eighty years on.

    Mike Levy is a teacher, journalist, playwright and Holocaust educator. He holds an IWM fellowship in Holocaust education and is currently working towards a part-time PhD on the work of wartime refugee committees in Cambridge and the East of England. For ten years he has run a series of community history projects which culminate in exhibitions and plays. These range from the Basque children’s hostels, the Dovercourt refugee camp, veterans of the merchant navy, the life of Thomas Paine and the Anders Army (for which he received a medal of honour from the Polish government). In 2015 he was instrumental in running the project on the pre-war Dovercourt camp with students from Harwich and Dovercourt School: the resulting exhibition is permanently displayed at the Redoubt.

    Tickets £5 Adult, under 21 free. Tickets through Eastern Angles Box Office online and Harwich Festival outlet at Harwich Library.

     

    www.harwichhavenhistory.co.uk

     

  • Fri
    25
    Jan
    2019
    7:30 pmThe Navigator Scout Hut, Main Road, Harwich.

    Harwich Society Talks

    • Talk - Harwich, The French Revolution & Napoleon. By Julian Foynes
    • 7pm for 7.30pm
    • Details 01255 553610
    • info@Harwich-society.co.uk

 

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